Physical Approaches Towards Understanding Metabolic Networks - from 2:30pm to 3:10pm

Tuesday 23 March 2021

from 14:30 to 15:10

(Europe/Paris)

Pr. James R. Heath - Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle

 

Upcoming Content

 

Controlling the properties of complex materials with light - from 3:20pm to 3:55pm

Tuesday 23 March 2021

from 15:20 to 15:55

(Europe/Paris)

 Pr. Daniele Fausti - University of Trieste

 

The rich phase diagrams of many transition metal oxides (TMOs) is the result of the intricate interplay between electrons, phonons, and magnons. This makes TMOs very susceptible to external parameters such as pressure, doping, magnetic field, and temperature which in turn can be used to finely tune their properties. The same susceptibility makes TMOs the ideal playground to design experiments where the interaction between tailored electromagnetic fields and matter can trigger the formation of new, sometimes exotic, physical properties. This aspect has been explored in time domain studies [1] and has led to the demonstration that ultrashort mid-IR light pulses can “force” the formation of quantum coherent states in matter, disclosing a new regime of physics where thermodynamic limits may be bridged and quantum effects can, in principle, appear at ambient temperatures.

In this presentation, I will review our recent results in archetypal strongly correlated cuprate superconductors [2,3,4], which demonstrated the feasibility of a light-based control of quantum phases in real materials. I will then introduce our new spectroscopic approach that goes beyond mean photon number observables [5-10] and show that the statistical features of light can provide richer information than standard linear and non-linear optical spectroscopies. Finally, I will elaborate on our current directions on leveraging both the electromagnetic field fluctuations and the strong driving of materials to control the onset of quantum coherent states in complex materials.

[1] Advances in physics 65, 58-238, 2016
[2] Science 331, 189-191 (2011)
[3] Phys. Rev. Lett. 122, 067002 (2019)
[4] https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.13447 (accepted Nat. Phys. 2020)
[5] Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 187403 (2017)
[6] New J. Phys. 16 043004 (2014)
[7] Nat. Comm. 6, 10249 (2015)
[8] PNAS March 19, 116 (12) 5383-5386 (2019)
[9] JoPhys. B 53, 145502 (2019)
[10] Optics Letters 45, 3498 (2020)

Poster Session - from 4:00pm to 4:25pm

Tuesday 23 March 2021

from 16:00 to 16:25

(Europe/Paris)

People interested in making a 5 minutes presentation during one of the two poster sessions are encouraged to send an email with title and short abstract of maximum one A4 page at emmanuel.mazer@probayes.com

Quantum Dynamics for Real-Time Processing of Excitonic Energy: .... - from 4:30pm to 5:05pm

Tuesday 23 March 2021

from 16:30 to 17:05

(Europe/Paris)

Pr. Greg Engel - The University of Chicago

Quantum Dynamics for Real-Time Processing of Excitonic Energy : Tuning Vibronic Coupling to Steer Energy Transfer within a Photosynthetic Complex

 

Photosynthetic species evolved to protect their light-harvesting apparatus from photoxidative damage driven by intracellular redox conditions or environmental conditions. The Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) pigment-protein complex from green sulfur bacteria exhibits redox-dependent quenching behavior partially due to two internal cysteine residues.

Here, we will show evidence that a photosynthetic complex exploits the quantum mechanics of vibronic mixing to activate an oxidative photoprotective mechanism. We use two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) to capture energy transfer dynamics in wild-type and cysteine-deficient FMO mutant proteins under both reducing and oxidizing conditions.

Under reducing conditions, we find equal energy transfer through the exciton 4-1 and 4-2-1 pathways because the exciton 4-1 energy gap is vibronically coupled with a bacteriochlorophyll-a vibrational mode. Under oxidizing conditions, however, the resonance of the exciton 4-1 energy gap is detuned from the vibrational mode, causing excitons to preferentially steer through the indirect 4-2-1 pathway to increase the likelihood of exciton quenching.

We use a Redfield model to show that the complex achieves this effect by tuning the site III energy via the redox state of its internal cysteine residues. This result shows how pigment-protein complexes exploit the quantum mechanics of vibronic coupling to steer energy transfer.

Discussions and conclusion - from 5:10pm to 5:50pm

Tuesday 23 March 2021

from 17:10 to 17:50

(Europe/Paris)

Discussions and conclusion with

Pr. Elisabetta Collini,

Pr. James R. Heath,

Pr. Daniele Fausti

Pr. Greg Engel 

Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals: Synthesis, the Role of the Surface, Heterostructures - from 2:30pm to 3:10pm

Wednesday 24 March 2021

from 14:30 to 15:10

(Europe/Paris)

Pr. Liberato Manna - Institute of Technology, Genova

 

Halide perovskite semiconductors can merge the highly efficient operational principles of conventional inorganic semiconductors with the low‑temperature solution processability of emerging organic and hybrid materials, offering a promising route towards cheaply generating electricity as well as light. Following a surge of interest in this class of materials, research on halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) as well has gathered momentum in the last years. While most of the emphasis has been put on CsPbX3 perovskite NCs, more recently the so-called double perovskite NCs, having chemical formula A+2B+B3+X6, have been identified as possible alternative materials, together with various other metal halides structures and compositions, often doped with various other elements. This talk will also discuss the research efforts of our group on these materials. 

 

We will highlight how for example halide double perovskite NCs are much less surface tolerant than the corresponding Pb-based perovskite NCs and that alternative surface passivation strategies need be devised in order to further optimize their optical performance. Other topics that will be covered are the role of surface ligands on stabilizing the NCs, including those with alloy compositions, and the synthesis of heterostructures in which one domain is a halide perovskite and the other domain is made of another material.

Quantum Rotors: Magnetometers, Accelerometers and Rotation Sensors - from 3:20pm to 3:55pm

Wednesday 24 March 2021

from 15:20 to 15:55

(Europe/Paris)

Pr. Yehuda Band, Ben-Gurion University

 

In a cold atom gas subject to a spin-dependent 2D optical lattice potential, trapped atoms undergo orbital motion around the minima of the potential. 

Such atoms are elementary quantum rotors (QRs). 

The theory of atomic QRs is developed. 

Wave functions, energies, and degeneracies are determined for both bosonic and fermionic QRs, as well as the magnetic dipole transitions between ground and excited states. 

QRs in optical lattices with precisely one atom per site can be used as a magnetometer, an accelerometer and a rotation sensor. 

Such devices have unprecedented accuracy. 

Poster Session - from 4:00pm to 4:25pm

Wednesday 24 March 2021

from 16:00 to 16:25

(Europe/Paris)

People interested in making a 5 minutes presentation during one of the two poster sessions are encouraged to send an email with title and short abstract of maximum one A4 page at emmanuel.mazer@probayes.com

COPAC - Coherent Optical Parallel Computing - from 4:30pm to 5:05pm

Wednesday 24 March 2021

from 16:30 to 17:05

(Europe/Paris)

 Pr.  Elisabetta Collini - University of Padova, Italy

COPAC is a transformative novel area in computing both because of the technology, coherent information transfer by ultrafast laser addressing of engineered quantum dots, QD, arrays and because of the specialized parallel processing of large amounts of information. We will make foundational experimental, theoretical and algorithmic innovations to demonstrate a new technological paradigm for ultrafast parallel multi-valued information processing. We aim to develop a ground-breaking nonlinear coherent spectroscopy combining optical addressing and spatially macroscopically resolved optical readout to achieve unprecedented levels of speed, density and complexity. Two key high-risk / high-reward pioneering elements are the quantum engineered coherent concatenation of units and the multidirectional optical detection. Experimental demonstrations on tailored multilayer QD arrays of increasing complexity, integration into a device and novel hardware and matched compilers will be delivered. Preliminary experimental demonstrations of the response of solutions and of QD films are available as is the validation of logic operation in parallel.

We use the dynamic response of the designed QD arrays to implement novel paradigms for parallel information processing. The discrete quantal level structure of nanosystems provides a memory at room temperature. Input will be provided simultaneously to all the levels by broadband laser pulses and the dynamical response will implement the logic in parallel. Disorder and environmental fluctuations are not detrimental because controlled level broadening is essential for the simultaneous multidirectional optical readout at the macroscopic level.

The long term vision of COPAC is the application of atomic and molecular state resolved controlled quantum dynamic processes towards information processing. Within this our targeted breakthrough is a novel prototype device for parallel logic engineered to industry standards and with suitable compilers.

 

Discussions and conclusion - from 5:10pm to 5:45pm

Wednesday 24 March 2021

from 17:10 to 17:50

(Europe/Paris)

Discussions and conclusion with

Pr. Yossi Paltiel,

Pr. Liberato Manna,

Pr. Yehuda Band 

Pr. Elisabetta Collini

Ultrafast and ultracold quantum simulator with attosecond precision - from 9:00am to 9:40am

Thursday 25 March 2021

from 09:00 to 09:40

(Europe/Paris)

Pr. Kenji Ohmori - Institute for Molecular Sciences, Okazaki

 

Many-body correlations govern a variety of important quantum phenomena including the emergence of superconductivity and magnetism in condensed matter as well as chemical reactions in liquids. Understanding quantum many-body systems is thus one of the central goals of modern sciences and technologies.

Here we demonstrate a new pathway towards this goal by generating a strongly correlated ultracold Rydberg gas with a broadband ultrashort laser pulse. We have applied our ultrafast coherent control with attosecond precision [1] to a strongly correlated Rydberg gas in an optical dipole trap, and have successfully observed and controlled its ultrafast many-body electron dynamics [2-4].

This new approach is now applied to an atomic BEC, Mott insulator lattice, and arbitrary array assembled with optical tweezers to develop into a pathbreaking platform for quantum simulation of strongly correlated many-body electron dynamics on the ultrafast timescale [5-7].

This project is in progress in tight collaboration with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.

 

References

[1] H. Katsuki et al., Acc. Chem. Res. 51, 1174 (2018).

[2] N. Takei et al., Nature Commun. 7, 13449 (2016).

Highlighted by Science 354, 1388 (2016); IOP PhyscisWorld.com (2016).

[3] C. Sommer et al., Phys. Rev. A 94, 053607 (2016).

[4] C. Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 121, 173201 (2018).

[5] M. Mizoguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 124, 253201 (2020).

[6] Patents (US and Japan) “Quantum simulator and quantum simulation method”, 
H. Sakai (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.), K. Ohmori (NINS) et al.
1 patented (US: 3rd. Nov. 2020) and 1 under examination (JP 2017) ; etc. 

[7] UC Boulder / NIST Quantum Technology Website : CUbit Quantum Initiative

https://www.colorado.edu/initiative/cubit/newsletter/newsletter/june-2020

“A metal-like quantum gas: A pathbreaking platform for quantum simulation”

Quantum simulations and the difficulty of solving many-body problems - from 9:45am to 10:20am

Thursday 25 March 2021

from 09:45 to 10:20

(Europe/Paris)

Pr. Ignacio Cirac - Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics

 

Quantum many-body systems are very hard to simulate, as computational resources (time and memory) typically grow exponentially with system size.

However, quantum computers or analog quantum simulators may perform that task in a much more efficient way.

In this talk, I will review some of the quantum algorithms that have been proposed for this task and then explain the advantages and disadvantages of analog quantum simulators.

In particular, I will describe methods to simulate the dynamics, to find ground states, or compute physical properties at finite temperatures.

 

Computational Challanges in Scalable Machine Learning algorithms - from 10:25am to 11:00am

Thursday 25 March 2021

from 10:25 to 11:00

(Europe/Paris)

 Pr. Naftlati Tishbi - The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Upcoming information

Next-generation optimization accelerators: .... - from 11:05am to 11:40am

Thursday 25 March 2021

from 11:05 to 11:40

(Europe/Paris)

Next-generation optimization accelerators : Solving NP-hard problems using integrated coherent Ising machines or memristive crossbar arrays

Dr. Thomas Van Vaerenbergh  - Photonics Research Engineer at Hewlett Packard Enterprise

 

Recent experimental results show how classical accelerators based on analog computing can outperform quantum annealing alternatives in benchmark task that require dense connection matrices.

In Hewlett Packard Labs, we have been studying two alternatives : integrated coherent Ising machines and mem-HNNS (based on memristive crossbar arrays). In this talk, we will discuss our recent progress for both platforms.

For this Ising machines, we will show how the choice of the nonlinearity in the activation function can affect performance and should hence not be overlooked in the accelerator design. 

A proper choice of nonlinearity can in some cases weekean the requirement of more advanced control algorithms in the annealer.

For the mem-HNN platform, we have previously shown that our in-memory analog computing approach has at least 10,000x higher Solution/sec/Watt compared to existing digital hardware and quantum counterparts.

An important challenge for commercial viability is that different industrial workloads typically benefit from multiples optimization algorithms. 

In this talk, we introduce additional combinatorial optimization algorithms, including quantum-inspired techniques, that can be deployed on our platform. This flexibility in algorithm choices in an important forward step to address the wide variety of enterprise-level use-cases such as airline scheduling, supply chain optimization, real-time bandwidth management, gene sequencing, etc.

Discussions and conclusion - from 11:45am to 12:25am

Thursday 25 March 2021

from 11:45 to 12:25

(Europe/Paris)

 

Discussions and conclusion with

Pr. Raphael D. Levine,

Pr. Kenji Ohmori,

Pr. Ignacio Cirac,

Pr. Naftlati Tishbi

Dr. Thomas Van Vaerenbergh

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